Thursday, April 5, 2012

Passion: let me not beg for the stilling of my pain

by PAULO COELHO
“Let me not pray to be sheltered from dangers,
but to be fearless in facing them.

Let me not beg for the stilling of my pain,
but for the heart to conquer it.

Let me not look for allies in life’s battlefield,
but to my own strength.

Let me not crave in anxious fear to be saved,
but hope for the patience to win my freedom.

Grant that I may not be a coward,
feeling Your mercy in my success alone;

But let me find the grasp of Your hand in my failure.”













Freedom

Rita Wilson rediscovers her "Oreo" Greek Heritage


The story of Hassan Ibrahimoff’s, Rita'f father before changing his name to Alan Wilson in the 1960s, was a mystery to his family. The show, "Who Do You Think You Are?" reveals the story of Hassan, who was born in the small village of Oreo near  the Greek town of Xanthi in 1920. The NBC television show has set out to trace the tracks he has left in order to reveal his life before the age of 30. The evidence suggests that he struggled with the vicissitudes of the Balkans in the era of pre- and post-war period to start a new life in the United States in 1949.
Rita Wilson admits at the beginning of the show that she knows very little about her father as a boy and young man. She heard he had spent several years working in a labour camp in Bulgaria, but as she says herself, she does not know what that means and cannot imagine the conditions under which such camps exist.
Her research started from the village of Oreo, where with the help of an interpreter, she found the house of his father and his cousins, who are Greek Muslims. They said that when Hassan was approximately 10 years old, the family moved to the town of Smolyan in Bulgaria. There, Rita met with a historian, who showed her documents declaring her father "fit" to serve in the Bulgarian army in 1941, when the army had occupied Xanthi. An incident of theft of five leva and water bottles lead to a conviction and imprisonment for Hassan, who was released about two years later.
He left the town of Smolyan and moved to the city of Plovdiv, where he married a young woman called Alicia. Two months later, their son was born. They had no luck and three days after the birth of their son called Emil, the mother died. The same happened to the child three months later. The American Wilson family never knew about these events. The news that her father had a family in Bulgaria with such a tragic fate filled Rita with emotions so that she could not restrain her tears.
After Hassan lost everything he loved, he left the city of Plovdiv and went to the city of Sofia. There, the special services began following him because they found out he wanted to leave communist Bulgaria. He tried to escape through the Turkish border, but was captured and sent to a labour camp for political prisoners. About two years later, Hassan managed to flee and never returned to Bulgaria.

www.lakisgavalas.gr


Greece’s most famous fashionistas, LakisGavalas was arrested with handcuffs and all the necessary accessories on Friday night in Athens. Police arrested “Mr. Lak” in the context of arresting big scale state debtors. Greek media report, that Gavalas was for almost a week the most wanted state debtor, but authorities efforts to locate him neither in his office nor in his home were fruitless. At the same time Gavalas was one of the Faboulous 5(Fab5) a reality show trying to turn an ordinary Greek man into a fashion icon. Nevertheless, on Friday night, Mr Lak decided to go to a night club and amused hismself  with other life-style icons of the Athens local society.
The Financial Crimes Units (SDOE) of the Greek Finance Ministry got a trace of him, but the arrest was executed by a Narcotics & Weapons police unit. Both units let apparently Gavalas first have a great time and they arrested him later after he had left the night club.
Greece’s famous entrepreneur -often celebrated in local media as ”King of Lifestyle”, “Guru of Fashion” and “Fashion Icon” – had already problems with the SDOE since last February.  At that time it was leaked to the Greek press that he was owing the state some 5 million euro. His debts to the state had squeezed him financially with the effect that he could not import anymore Burberry, D&G or Dior and his customers were outraged about delayed or cancelled deliveries.
Greece keep talking

Athens: Suicide Man Leaves Behind Shocking Note


“The occupation government of Tsolakoglou* literally annihilated any possibility for my survival that was depended on a decent pension which only I personally paid for 35 years (without any state support).Because my age does not give me the possibility for a dynamic reaction (without meaning that if a Greek would grab the kalashnikov, I wouldn’t be the second one [to grab one], I see no other solution than the decent end before I start searching in the garbage for food.I believe that one day the youth without future will take the arms and hang upside down at Syntagma Square the national traitors as the Italians did with Mussolini  in 1945 Piazza Poreto in Milan)”

D.X. was married and had a daughter. He was a member of the Greek Pharmacists’ Association. He had sold his pharmacy in 1994 and had gone into retirement. It looks as if the several pension cuts of the last two years had  created such conditions that the man could not bear.
Meanwhile, dozens of Athenians flocked to the spot where D.X. committed suicide, less than two hundred meters away from the Greek Parliament, and started to leave flowers, candles and notes full of anger and indignation against the social injustice of the austerity measures.
When the paramedics removed his corpse in the morning, the stunned passengers had applaud. D.X. killed himself on Wednesday morning under a park tree with a single bullet on his head. Greek politicians expressed their shock and shed the usual crocodile tears. 
http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2125084/Greek-pensioner-commits-suicide-outside-Greek-parliament.html

Tuesday, April 3, 2012